Defending the faith in the battles of everyday life

guns-255x255Politics and Faith often are not far from one another in American culture and society. Many Catholics shy away from injecting their faith too far into religion, but a proper understanding, I believe, if that our faith must animate and drive our political beliefs.

That being said, I found two articles yesterday worth reading I think they are prime examples of just how that occurs.

The first by Pia De Solenni,: “Guns and Gun Control.” This is often a touchy subject for some Catholics and I believe she does an excellent job at fairly talking about the issue.

Nevertheless, as a Catholic theologian, I am troubled by accounts suggesting that Catholics who don’t support the U.S. bishops on gun control are  akin to Catholics who disagree with fundamental moral teachings like  contraception, abortion and marriage.

Regardless of the passion of some gun-control advocates, there exist clear  distinctions between these issues.

The article is worth the read regardless of what side of this you are on.

The second is about fighting the pro-life battle in the political arena, and not just by defending life, but actually going on the tactical offensive a bit. Dave Weigel talks about how in Virginia a move by an off-shoot of the SBA List is putting messaging about the danger to women’s health through some pro-abortion laws.

Pro-life politicians have talked all year about flipping the script on Democrats and making them struggle to explain their abortion stances. To a very large extent, that was the point of the campaign to spur more coverage of Kermit Gosnell’s murder trial in Philadelphia. Why should Todd Akin have to answer a hypothetical question about the ugly aspects of banning abortion? Make Democrats answer hypotheticals about the ugliest aspects of legalization.

Again, worth the read, and an interesting race developing there in Virginia.

It is important to remember that as Catholics, our beliefs of the faith, our adherence to the Church’s teaching, and our moral convictions are not “stances on issues” but the inner core of our philosophical base. They are what should animate our political beliefs and our social understanding.

As I mentioned yesterday, where we get into trouble is when we attempt to fit our faith to our social and political beliefs – it should be that we fit those to the teachings of the Church and Jesus Christ.